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Job Market Candidates

The following Ph.D. students are on or nearing the job market. Candidates can be contacted directly.

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Peng Chen

chenp5@uw.edu | Qing Shen, Adviser

Research

Peng’s work focuses on the connection between the built environment and travel behavior with a variety of research interests in mobility management, rail transit-oriented development, transportation safety, land use policy, and parking. His doctoral dissertation used four interrelated papers to examine how the built environment correlates with bicycle route choice, crash frequency, injury outcome, and bicycle volume, using Seattle’s data. Peng’s other research involves the use of new techniques to understand future human mobility. His ongoing projects (PI: Cynthia Chen) are supported by DOE (ARPA-E), NIH, and PacTrans.

Teaching

Peng is currently a co-instructor/independent-instructor for two courses on urban transportation planning and travel demand forecasting. Peng has also served as a Teaching Assistant in quantitative analysis, planning studio, urban economics, public policy, and introduction to GIS courses. He prefers teaching technical planning courses such as transportation planning, travel demand forecasting, land use planning, transport and land use policy, urban economics, health and the built environment, quantitative analysis, and geo-spatial analysis.

Publications

    1. Qing Shen*, Peng Chen, Haixiao Pan (2016). “Factors affecting car ownership and mode choice in rail transit-supported suburbs of a large Chinese city”, Transportation Research, Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2016.08.027
    2. Qian Liu*, James Wang, Peng Chen, Zuopeng Xiao (2016). “How does parking interplay with the built environment and affect automobile commuting in high-density cities? A case study in China”, Urban Studies, SAGE, DOI: 10.1177/0042098016667040
    3. Peng Chen*, Jiangping Zhou (2016). “Effects of the built environment on pedestrian crash frequencies and risks”, Journal of Transport and Health, Elsevier, DOI: 10.1016/j.jth.2016.06.008
    4. Hai Xiao Pan, Jing Li*, Peng Chen (2016). “Study on the ownership of motorized and non-motorized vehicles in suburban metro station areas – a structural equation approach”, Urban Rail Transit, Springer, DOI: 10.1007/s40864-016-0037-x
    5. Peng Chen*, Qing Shen (2016). “Estimating built environment effects on cyclist injury severity in automobile involved bicycle crashes”, Accident Analysis and Prevention, Elsevier, DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2015.11.002
    6. Peng Chen* (2015). “Built environment factors in explaining the automobile involved bicycle crash frequencies: a spatial statistic approach”, Safety Science, Elsevier, DOI: 10.1016/j.ssci.2015.06.016

Awards

ckim

Chung Ho Kim

charisut@uw.edu | Dan Abramson, Adviser

Research

Chung Ho is an architect, urban designer, and urban scholar with a strong background in urban design and physical planning. As the only winner of 2010 Korean Government Study-abroad Scholarship in the field of architecture and urban planning, he has investigated East Asia’s rapid urbanization and built-environments driven developments. His dissertation investigated the national-scale rapid conversion of traditional to modern villages driven by the Korean New Village Movement (KNVM) in the 1970s. He conducted historical interpretation on KNVM’s built environments transformation and the accompanying social-ecological resilience assessments under the guidance of Professors Dan Abramson, Stevan Harrell, Ken Yocom, and Clark Sorensen. Chung Ho’s doctoral research has been honored by the Outstanding PhD Student Award from the Department of Urban Design and Planning as well as the Karen R. Polenske Best Student Paper Award from the International Association for Chinese Planning (IACP) in 2013 and 2014. In addition, he was awarded a Graduate Certificate in Demographic Methods from UW-CSDE (Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology). Prior to the PhD program, he had won many prizes from a variety of international and domestic design competitions such as “Sejong Prime Minister’s Official Residence” (3rd Prize), “Incheon Children’s Science Museum” (1st Prize, KIRA Excellent Prize), “Korea University New Campus Center” (1st Prize, KIA Best 7 Award) and so on. On top of that, he has a bachelor (Magna Cum Laude) and master degrees in Architecture from Seoul National University and was a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania.

Teaching

Chung Ho has taught a variety of studios and classes as a pre-doctoral teaching associate at the UW: Shanghai Tower Studio, China Village Studio, Urban Design Studios (Redmond, WA / El Salvador), Urban Planning Studio (Vashon Island, WA), Planning Methods, Digital Design Practicum, and Urban Form. The design and planning studios focused on contemporary sustainable issues, including creating vertical communities in the 121-story Megatall skyscraper of Shanghai; envisioning earthquake-prone urban areas of Redmond with post-earthquake scenarios, and providing agricultural development plans for the rural areas of Vashon-Maury Island. Meanwhile, in labs and classes, he has taught hands-on skills including Excel, R, and ArcGIS as well as graphic techniques through Adobe InDesign and Photoshop, SketchUp, and Geodesign. Based on the course evaluations and annual, departmental program review, he has had highly positive feedback from students and faculty.

Publications

    1. Kim, C. H. (2015) The Ecological Impact of the Korean Saemaul (New Rural Community) Movement, 1970-1979. In X. Chen & Q. Pan (Eds.) Building Resilient Cities in China: The Nexus between Planning and Science, Springer, pp. 119-132 (DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-14145-9_10)
    2. Abramson, D., Kim C. H. (2014) Lessons from Urban Design Studio for Community Resilience, In Freitag, B., Abramson, D., Chalana M. (Eds.) Whole Community Resilience: An Asset-Based Approach to Enhancing Adaptive Capacity Before a Disruption, Seattle, WA: Institute for Hazards Mitigation Planning and Research, University of Washington
    3. Bae, C., Bassok A., Kim C. H. (2013) Near Road Pollution Exposure and Public Health in Seoul: Lessons from Seattle, In Kim, E. J. & Kim T.-H. (Eds.) Case Study on the Cities of Healthy and Longevity in Korea, Anyang, Korea: Korea Research Institute for Human Settlements (KRIHS)

Presentations

    1. Kim, C. H., Gong, Y. (2016) Establishing Comparative Framework of Rural Development in East Asia: Korean New Village Movement and Chinese New Socialist Countryside Construction. (full paper presented to the 10th International Association for China Planning Conference, Beijing, China)
    2. Kim, C. H. (2016) Village Continuity, Transformation, and Adaptation for Sustainable Rural Development: Lessons from First Saemaul Village in Cheonan, 1972-2014. (invited to the 2016 Conference of Environment and Environmentalism in East Asia, organized by the University of Alberta’s Taiwan Studies, Banff, Canada)
    3. Kim, C. H. (2016) Avoiding the Success Trap of Rural Modernization: Lessons from Success and Consequences of Korean Saemaul Undong in the 1970s. (full paper presented to the 2016 Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, Seattle, WA)
    4. Kim, C. H., Abramson, D. (2015) Revisiting Korean Saemaul Movement: President Park’s Experiments in 1970s and Forty-year Villagers’ Adaptation. (full paper presented to the 55th Annual Conference of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, Houston, TX)
    5. Kim, C. H. (2015) Development of Emptiness: Urban Renewal through Megastructure Demolition. (full paper presented to the 8th International Conference on Planning and Design, Tainan, Taiwan)
    6. Kim, C. H. (2014) Resilience Assessment of Korean Rapid Urbanization, 1970-2000. (full paper presented to the 8th International Association for China Planning Conference, Guangzhou, China)

Awards

    2015 Research Grant, ($2,000) International Young Researchers Support Program, Land and Housing Institute, Daejeon, Korea
    2014 Karen R. Polenske Best Student Paper Award ($500), 8th International Association for Chinese Planning (IACP) Conference, Guangzhou, China
    2014 Outstanding PhD Student Award, Department of Urban Design and Planning, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    2013 Karen R. Polenske Best Student Paper Award ($500), 7th International Association for Chinese Planning (IACP) Conference, Shanghai, China
    2012 Korean Honor Scholarship ($1,000), Embassy of the Republic of Korea, Washington D.C.
    2010 Korean Government Study-abroad Scholarship ($62,000), National Institute for International Education, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea.

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Susmita Rishi

srishi@uw.edu | Mark Purcell, Adviser

Research

Susmita Rishi is a Ph.D. Candidate (ABD) in the Interdisciplinary Program in Urban Design and Planning and is scheduled to defend her dissertation in January 2017. Before coming to the University of Washington, Susmita received an M.Arch. in Urban and Community Design from Pennsylvania State University and worked as an Urban Designer and Architect in Mumbai, India. Susmita’s research and teaching address the politics of urbanization, informality, social justice, international planning, and social policy. More specifically, Susmita focuses on developing tools to understand the complex economic, and socio-cultural mechanisms within the rapidly urbanizing areas of the world, as well as proposing innovative ways planners, designers, and citizens can intervene in the informal processes of city building. To this end, her Ph.D. dissertation, “Alternate Conceptualizations of Value and Space: Learning from the slumdwellers of Delhi” attempts to understand how residents of informal settlements value their spaces. Using grounded theory analysis of more than 125 in-depth semi-structured ethnographic interviews and participant observations carried out over three years in New Delhi, Susmita highlights the different ways in which residents find value in their spaces and reconceptualizes informal settlements as spaces of legitimate value. This new conceptualization of value is intended to change how planners, designers, architects, and policy makers understand and intervene in informal settlements. Her dissertation work is guided by an interdisciplinary committee of scholars chaired by Dr. Mark Purcell (Urban Design and Planning) and with Dr. Manish Chalana (Urban Design and Planning), Dr. Miriam Kahn (Anthropology) and Dr. Sunila Kale (South Asian Studies) serving as committee members. In the future, Susmita plans to continue analyzing the role that urban spaces play at the intersection of planned cities, informality and social value, with comparative work based in US and in the global South.

Teaching

Susmita’s teaching philosophy is defined by a deep respect for the intellectual and social diversity of her students and a belief that effective teaching depends on mastery of the material, the challenge of critical thinking and application to the student, and the creation of a flexible and welcoming class environment. Further, serving on the Department’s Diversity Committee has given her a greater appreciation for the needs and concerns of students from a wide range of backgrounds. Susmita has independently created and taught four courses while at the University of Washington. “Urbanization and the Asian City” explored historic and contemporary urbanization processes, as well as the different urbanisms and urbanites that shape these processes in Asia. “Cities of the Global South” focused more broadly on the cities of the Global South and the trends and themes that have shaped urbanscapes and built environment in the Global South. Through both of these courses Susmita builds students’ awareness of the complexity that defines cities in the Global South and helps them to think critically about these cities and their problems. Further, Susmita used her experience as an architect and urban designer to update, upgrade and teach a quasi-studio course called Digital Design Practicum, under the guidance of Dr. Manish Chalana. The course teaches undergraduate and graduate students who are primarily from the Department of Urban Design and Planning how best to utilize software tools including Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, and ArcGIS. Students in this class then apply what they’ve learned during the quarter to design and present a live studio project based in Seattle. Susmita has also worked as a teaching associate for courses such as “Applied Research Design in Urban Design and Planning”, “Comprehensive Planning and Implementation” and others, for graduate students in the Department of Urban Design and Planning. Susmita also has extensive experience running architectural and urban design studios from her time at Penn State.

Publications

    1. Chalana, Manish, and Susmita Rishi (equal).(2016) “Making Sense of the Order in the Disorder in Delhi’s Kathputli Colony.” In Messy Urbanism: The Dynamic Landscape of “Other” Cities. HKU Press.
    2. Chalana, Manish, and Susmita Rishi (equal). (2015)“Twilight in Delhi: The Failure of Slum Rehabilitation Programs in Creating a Healthier City.” In Transforming Distressed Global Communities: Making Inclusive, Safe, Resilient, and Sustainable Cities. Ashgate.

Presentations

    1. “Quiet Social Movements & Everyday Life in the urban global South: Towards New Geographies of Social Change” at Annual Meeting of American Association of Geographers (AAG), Boston. (2017) Panelist
    2. “Towards a Relational Understanding of Urban Informality and Planning”, American Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP) Annual Meeting, Portland. (2016) Panelist.
    3. “Re-Placing ‘the South’ in Postcolonial Research” at AAG, San Francisco. (2016) Paper presented with Amy Piedalue
    4. “Alternative Conceptualizations of Value and Space: Learning from the Slumdwellers of Delhi” at SACPAN Portland. (2016) Paper presentation.
    5. “History, Policy and Politics: Envisioning Delhi as a more Humane and Just ‘Global City’”, at AAG Chicago. (2015) Paper Presentation.

Awards

    2015-16 Faculty Medal for exceptional work in theory/research and providing intellectual leadership, College of Built Environments, UW, Seattle
    2015-16 Graduate School Presidential Dissertation Fellowship, UW, Seattle
    2015-16 Taraknath Das Foundation Grant, Columbia University
    2015-16 Gill-Chin Lim Travel Award, ACSP Global Planning Educators Interest Group
    2014-15 Outstanding Student Award, UW, Seattle
    2014-15 Jay Bee Memorial Scholarship for academic excellence, UW, Seattle

jscully

Jason Y. Scully

jscully@uw.edu | Anne Vernez-Moudon, Adviser

Research

Jason Scully’s work expands upon the neighborhood effects scholarship in public health by examining the entirety of environmental influences to which individuals are exposed over the course of a day. This research relies on data from global positioning systems (GPS), self-reported travel diaries and geographic information systems (GIS) to create spatio-temporal measures of environmental exposure.

Jason received his Ph.D. in June 2016 under the mentorship of Anne Vernez Moudon (committee chair). His dissertation committee was interdisciplinary with members from the departments of Epidemiology (Adam Drewnowski), Sociology (Kyle Crowder), Psychology (Brian Flaherty), and Urban Planning and Design (Philip M. Hurviz). His dissertation research part of a larger interdisciplinary collaboration between urban planners and epidemiologists in the Urban Form Lab. This collaborative project explores built environment influences on obesity, weight gain and food-related behaviors. His dissertation comprised three research questions on this topic, where in his first question he used GPS data to examine the locational accuracy of self-reported travel diary data. In the second question he created a novel measure of exposure to fast food restaurants based on participants’ spatio-temporal relationships to the restaurants whereas previous research largely focused on the count or density of restaurants in relation to participants’ home addresses. For the last question, he measured the residential property values of all of the places participants traveled to throughout the day and compared the average to the residential property values in participant’s home neighborhood. Prior to pursuing doctoral studies, Jason was employed by the Urban Land Institute where he wrote extensively on topics pertaining to real estate development.

Teaching

Jason served as a teaching assistant for a range of both online and in-person classes and is prepared to teach both graduate and undergraduate classes. Courses he has TA’ed include: the Urban Form, the Legal and Administrative Framework of Planning, Strategic Planning, Introduction to Urban Planning, and Comprehensive Planning and Land Use. In addition to the aforementioned courses, Jason is prepared to teach courses GIS, research methods, introductory statistics, and the intersection between public health and urban planning.

Publications

    1. Kang, B., Scully, J.Y., Stewart, O., Hurvitz, P.M., Moudon, A.V. (2015). Split-match-aggregate (SMA) algorithm: Integrating sidewalk data with transportation network data in GIS. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 29(3): 440-53.
    2. Moudon, A.V., Kang, B, Scully, J.Y. & Stewart, O. (2013). Sidewalk Data in King County’s Urban Growth Boundary. Seattle, WA: Washington State Transportation Center (TRAC). WA-RD 806.2.
    3. Schmitz, A., & Scully, J.Y., (2006). Creating Walkable Places: Compact mixed-use solutions. Washington, DC: ULI—the Urban Land Institute.
    4. Scully, J.Y., Moudon, A.V., Hurvitz, P.M., Aggarwal, A., Drewnowski, A. (in preparation). A time-based objective measure of exposure to the food environment.
    5. Scully, J.Y., Moudon, A.V., Hurvitz, P.M., Aggarwal, A., Drewnowski, A. (in preparation). GPS or travel diary: Comparing spatial and temporal characteristics of visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets.

Presentations

    1. Scully, J.Y., Moudon, A.V., Hurvitz, P.M., Drewnowski, A., Aggarwal, A. (2016). Geospatial research can learn from exposure science. National Cancer Institute Conference on Geospatial Approaches to Cancer Control and Population Sciences, September, 2016. Bethesda, MD.
    2. Scully, J.Y., Moudon, A.V., Hurvitz, P.M., Cook, A., Aggarwal, A., & Drewnowski, A. (2014). Socioeconomic influences moderate the relation between the size of food-based activity spaces and body mass index (BMI). Experimental Biology 2014. San Diego, CA.
    3. Scully, J.Y., and Hurvitz, P.M. (2013). Guest speakers. Food-related behavior: A spatial perspective. University of Washington Graduate Seminar in Nutritional Sciences, December, 2013. Seattle, WA.

Awards

    2016 Outstanding Student Award, University of Washington College of Built Environments
    2014 Focus Fellow, Georgia Institute of Technology
    2010 Hall-Ammerer-WRF Graduate Fellowship, University of Washington